Tom Bullock

Tom Bullock decided to trade the khaki clad masses and traffic of Washington DC for Charlotte in 2014. Before joining WFAE, Tom spent 15 years working for NPR.  Over that time he served as everything from an intern to senior producer of NPR’s Election Unit.  Tom also spent five years as the senior producer of NPR’s Foreign Desk where he produced and reported from Iraq, Afghanistan, Yemen, Haiti, Egypt, Libya, Lebanon among others.  Tom is looking forward to finally convincing his young daughter, Charlotte, that her new hometown was not, in fact, named after her.

For the second time in a seven-day span, the U.S. Supreme Court has struck down an act of North Carolina's General Assembly.

On May 15th, it was the state's voter laws.

On Monday, in a 5-3 decision, the court upheld a ruling that two congressional districts were illegal racial gerrymanders. And this opinion may have implications for other North Carolina cases working their way through the courts.

Hoarding $70 million in Medicaid money that should be spent on patients while spending lavishly on CEO pay and luxury board retreats. These are just some of the findings laid out in a state audit of Cardinal Innovations Healthcare. The company says the spending is justified.

America's judicial system has been the target of a number of political attacks this year.

And not just from President Donald Trump questioning the legitimacy of some, quote "so-called" judges or saying he wants to break up the Federal appeals court which struck down his travel ban.

A new report by the left leaning Brennan Center for Justice finds Republican controlled legislatures across the country are targeting state courts and remaking them for potential political gain. They have tracked at least 41 such bills in 15 states and that's just since January 1 of this year.

The U.S. House of Representatives has passed a replacement for the Affordable Care Act, best known as Obamacare.

And this version is different from a version the House failed to pass just weeks ago.

North Carolina's treasurer has been given the green light to sell up to $450 million in new bonds.  

The proceeds will not be used to build roads or schools, but to pay off other outstanding state debt.

Craft brewers lost an important political fight Tuesday. A committee in the North Carolina House voted to strip provisions from a bill which would allow local brewers to sell more of their own product without going through a middle man.

Arguably the most famous Democratic congressman to represent South Carolina's 5th district is one Frank Underwood.

But Underwood is a work of fiction, the lead character in the TV series House of Cards. And South Carolina's 5th Congressional District has been a Republican stronghold since 2010.

Still, there are three candidates looking to make life imitate fiction and flip the 5th back to the Democrats. They face their first challenge May 2 in a primary special election. On Monday, WFAE’s Tom Bullock focused on the Republican candidates. This story focuses on the Democratic candidates. Toms’ coverage includes a conversation with Morning Edition host Marshall Terry:

Voters in South Carolina's 5th congressional district will head to the polls May 2 to take part in a special election for Congress. The district is a sprawling one stretching through much of the upstate down to south and east of Columbia.

There are at least 14 people running for the seat.

And while the race hasn't garnered the national attention of other special elections in Kansas and Georgia, the race could have national ramifications.

This story may sound familiar.

The scene: Raleigh.

The plot: A lawmaker introduces a plan to expand Medicaid, the federal insurance program for the poor and disabled.

This has been done a number of times before. And each time has gone nowhere. But this time there's a twist.

On Wednesday the North Carolina Senate passed a tax cut bill with a catchy name. This vote was never in doubt. The bill passed the House Tuesday in a party line vote. And the bill's name played a prominent role in that debate.

As North Carolina's new treasurer, Republican Dale Folwell has two key jobs: run the pension and health care systems for state employees and retirees.

Both, Folwell says, are in trouble.

A deal to repeal House Bill 2 has been reached.

Democratic Governor Roy Cooper and Republican leaders in the General Assembly made the announcement late Wednesday night. They all called it a compromise.

After days of closed-door caucus meetings, political theater and negotiations, the announcement was surprisingly brief.

"We have reached an agreement with the governor," said Senate leader Phil Berger.

He took no questions, per an agreement he made with Governor Cooper.

A top sports recruiter in North Carolina sent out a tweet earlier today with a warning: North Carolina legislators must address HB 2 within the next 48 hours or lose out on all NCAA championship games for the next six years.

House Speaker Tim Moore has given his fellow Republican representatives a bit of homework this weekend.Consider a new plan which would change House Bill 2.

Change, yes, but not a full repeal. WFAE's Nick De La Canal talks with WFAE's Tom Bullock about the proposal.

NDC: Tom, let's  jump right in with the most well-known part of HB 2. Would this plan drop or change the bathroom provisions of the bill?

For the first time Governor Roy Cooper stood before a joint session of the legislature to deliver his state of the state address.

It was a chance for Cooper to push his priorities. But given the tone of the official Republican response, that's a tall order.

Every two years North Carolina's governor is invited to give the state of the state address. And here is how Governor Roy Cooper sees it: "I want to begin by reporting to you that the state of our state is promising."

It's an interesting choice, which needed some explanation.

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