GOP Senate Bill Would Cut Health Care Coverage By 22 Million

Updated at 8:10 pm ET Congressional forecasters say a Senate bill that aims to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act would leave 22 million more people uninsured by 2026. That's only slightly fewer uninsured than a version passed by the House in May . Monday's report from the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office could give moderate senators concerned about health care coverage pause. Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, was quick to register her opposition to the bill. Senate Republican...

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Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

WRAL

North Carolina Republicans introduced and advanced controversial legislation in the final days of session that would reshape district lines for judicial races across the state.

Updated at 8:10 pm ET

Congressional forecasters say a Senate bill that aims to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act would leave 22 million more people uninsured by 2026.

That's only slightly fewer uninsured than a version passed by the House in May.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is trying to wrangle the votes he needs to pass a health care bill by the end of the week. But a growing number of Republican senators have said they will not support it. Conservatives want costs slashed even further, but moderates are concerned about the proposed rollback of Medicaid benefits for millions of people.

Updated at 5 p.m. ET

Senate Republicans have updated their plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, attempting to patch a hole that threatened to destabilize the individual insurance market.

The week begins with a number of questions about the Senate health care bill, chiefly whether it has enough votes to pass this week, as Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell wants.

Also, today the Supreme Court let part of President Trump’s travel ban take effect while the court reviews it, and justices also issued two big rulings on religious liberty and separation of church and state.

This week, President Trump will combine his three roles — president, businessman and politician — into one event at the Trump Hotel in Washington. At an expensive fundraiser for his 2020 re-election, he not only will rake in cash for his campaign, but also run up a huge pile of revenues for his business. His latest financial disclosure suggests that it is lucrative for him to spend time at his own properties.

The Supreme Court has agreed to take up a case on whether the owner of a Colorado cake shop can refuse to provide service to same-sex couples due to his religious beliefs about marriage.

Jack Phillips, who along with his wife owns Masterpiece Cakeshop in suburban Denver, has argued that a state law compelling him to produce wedding cakes for gay couples, which runs counter to his religious beliefs, violates his right to free speech under the First Amendment.

The Supreme Court released its final decisions of the current session Monday morning, announcing it will hear the President Trump travel ban cases from the bench this fall.

The court also said it will take on the case of a baker in Colorado who refused to bake a cake for a same-sex couple, on the grounds that it would violate his religious beliefs.

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Arts & Performance

Blue Ridge Public Radio continues to invest in the development of local programming and content with the hiring of Matt Peiken as the NPR station’s first Arts Producer.

Peiken, whose entire journalism career has concentrated in covering arts and culture, will produce segments for Morning Edition and All Things Considered, and will develop a range of digital elements for BPR’s web and mobile platforms. He’ll also lay the groundwork for a new, weekly arts and performance showcase for BPR.

WCQS

It's a bittersweet day here at Blue Ridge Public Radio.  Thirty one years ago this month, music director Dick Kowal hit the airwaves.   Today, he hosted his last show.   While it's  impossible to capture all of the amazing accomplishments of his talented career, we do have some highlights, and a few good stories.  BPR's Helen Chickering reports.

(Dick Kowal on the air)

“It’s about 6 minutes after 9, good morning.”

If you live in Western North Carolina, chances are, you know this voice.

(Dick Kowal on the air)