BPR & Citizen-Times Partner For Two Asheville City Council Debates

Blue Ridge Public Radio and the Asheville Citizen-Times will partner on two debates with candidates for Asheville City Council. The first debate will be held Monday October 23rd at noon in the BPR studios. It can be watched live on the BPR News Facebook page . It will be aired the following Friday October 27th at noon in place of The State of Things. A second debate will be held at a venue of the Citizen-Times choosing at a date to be determined. Early voting for the general election starts...

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The State of Things

“The State of Things” covers diverse issues & topics in NC. Frank Stasio talks to authors, musicians, politicians, & citizens about subjects that matter to North Carolinians.

Last week in the Russia investigations: Reports are growing about Russian-linked interference beyond the Web and in real life, three senators pitch a bill to tackle digital active measures and Big Tech says it'll play ball in Capitol Hill's big show on Nov. 1.

Influence-mongering in real life

Accounts are piling up in which Russian influence-mongers evidently did more than interfere with Americans online last year — they also did so in person.

It has been a quarter of a century since reliably red Alabama elected a Democrat to the U.S. Senate. But Democrats see an opening in the upcoming special election to fill Attorney General Jeff Sessions' old seat because of the controversial record of Republican candidate Roy Moore, which includes twice being removed from public office.

For the first time since 2013, the five living former presidents appeared together at a concert Saturday night to raise money for hurricane victims.

Democrats Barack Obama, Bill Clinton and Jimmy Carter and Republicans George H.W. and George W. Bush were on stage in College Station, Texas, to try to unite the country after the recent storms.

The concert at Texas A&M's Reed Arena was to raise money for the victims of Hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria.

Former Trump chief strategist Steve Bannon unleashed a torrent of insults against former President George W. Bush in California Friday night.

"President Bush embarrassed himself," Bannon said, in a 40-minute address at an annual California Republican Party convention in Anaheim, Calif. "He has no earthly idea whether he is coming or going just like it was when he was president of the United States," Bannon said to a smattering of applause and laughter.

Toting up the damage and lessons learned from the deadly, devastating California wildfires. 

The NAACP — which at 108 years old must balance both its storied legacy as the nation's oldest civil rights group and the potential for irrelevance amid a fresh wave of racial justice groups born of social media such as Black Lives Matter — decided to shake things up a bit on Saturday.

The organization announced its new president and CEO and its intention to alter its tax status to a non-profit category that permits more aggressive political lobbying.

Less than a week before chief strategist Steve Bannon was axed from the White House President Trump said, "We'll see what happens with Mr. Bannon."

The day before announcing he wouldn't re-certify the Iran nuclear deal Trump told Sean Hannity on Fox News, "We will see what happens, pretty soon."

At the end of every summer, scientist Li Zhongqin takes his seasonal hike near the top of a glacier in the Tianshan mountains in China's far northwestern region of Xinjiang.

Li scrambles over a frozen ridge and heads toward a lone pole wedged in the ice. Clouds emerge from a peak above and quickly blow past. He stops to catch his breath. He is at 14,000 feet. The snow is thick. The air is thin.

Our weekly roundup of education news and happenings may make you uncomfortable, but please don't ban our inconvenient truths.

A Mississippi district bans To Kill A Mockingbird

A deal was announced this week to end litigation over legislation that replaced House Bill 2. The proposal would allow transgender people to use public bathrooms that correspond with their gender identity…that is only in agencies that are under the Governor’s control. But the settlement is missing the approval of one notable defendant: the state legislature. It would also need the approval of a judge. 

Shannon Gilreath, a law professor at Wake Forest University, talks about the deal and an executive order associated with it.   

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Arts & Performance

NOTE: This is the second in a two-part series on the Asheville Symphony Orchestra's search for its next music director.

 

Here’s an interesting situation that become a piece of obscure trivia:

Daniel Meyer was among six finalists this past season to become the next music director of the Fresno Philharmonic, in California. The person who won the position is Rei Hotoda. Now, Hotoda is one of six finalists to succeed Meyer on the podium of the Asheville Symphony.

NOTE: This is the first in a two-part series about the search for the Asheville Symphony Orchestra’s next music director.

 

The Asheville Symphony is a part-time orchestra. Everyone responsible for the music has another job, or two jobs. So it’s a little stunning to learn how many people applied to become the orchestra’s next music director.

 

437.