Teachers

BPR News

Among the thousands of teachers who filled the streets of North Carolina's capital Wednesday, were hundreds of educators from Western North Carolina.  Many who were unable to make the trip to Raleigh attended satellite rallies, including one in Asheville. 

“Thank you so much for coming today”

Around 10 o’clock Wednesday morning, teachers and supporters who couldn’t make the rally in Raleigh, gathered at THE BLOCK off biltmore in  downtown Asheville to make posters and phone calls to lawmakers

Teachers in Arizona are protesting for higher pay, while Kentucky educators rallied at their state capitol this Friday. The same day, Oklahoma teachers ended a 9-day walkout, rivaling the length of time West Virginia teachers left their classrooms last month. Distressed teachers seeking higher pay and better funding for education have created a movement in red states, leaving some to wonder, will North Carolina teachers join in next?

North Carolina teachers do not want their colleagues not even trained ones to carry guns in school, according to a new Elon University Poll.

State Superintendent Mark Johnson is asking teachers whether or not they would like to be armed. So far, most say no. Johnson sent an informal, online poll in an email to all of the about 100,000 public school teachers across the state Thursday morning and received more than 19,000 responses in the first 24 hours.

Over the past few years, teachers across North Carolina received highly publicized pay raises.

The increases were generally met with few objections and heralded as long overdue.

Left out of the press releases, however, was a shift that reduced teaching assistant positions, something that will hurt disadvantaged students across the state.


Jeremy Loeb/WCQS

NPR will be in Asheville on Tuesday February 7th for the latest 'Going There' event.  Weekend All Things Considered host Michel Martin will lead a night of performances and discussion on the topic 'What Happens When Your Hometown Gets Hot?' at the Diana Wortham Theater.  Tickets for the event have sold out but there will be a live stream that night to watch.  You can also join the conversation on Twitter by following @NPRMichel and @WCQS using the hashtag #HotHometown.

On this episode of the WUNCPolitics Podcast we focus on a single, perhaps defining, topic in the race for the next Governor: Pat McCrory's record on teacher pay. It’s an issue upon which he may very well be pinning his re-election hopes.

In two weeks, most of North Carolina's public school students will head back to the classroom. We talked to two Duke University researchers to get some tips for how parents can start the year off with their best foot forward.

A planned apartment complex in Asheville will make it easier for new teachers to find housing in a city where affordable housing can be hard to come by.

The Asheville Citizen-Times reports that the project which will have 28 units is expected to open by early summer of 2017.

nea.org

The North Carolina General Assembly is close to finalizing a nearly $22 billion dollar fiscal year budget.  The President of the North Carolina Association of Educators says when it comes to spending on K-12 education, the plan falls far short of what is needed.  State lawmakers did include a boost in pay for first year teachers and Rodney Ellis says that's about the extent of the good news.