teacher pay

North Carolina teachers are expected to get a raise of $891 this year, on average, which would bump the state up two spots when compared to other states.

Teachers in Arizona are protesting for higher pay, while Kentucky educators rallied at their state capitol this Friday. The same day, Oklahoma teachers ended a 9-day walkout, rivaling the length of time West Virginia teachers left their classrooms last month. Distressed teachers seeking higher pay and better funding for education have created a movement in red states, leaving some to wonder, will North Carolina teachers join in next?

Now that the state House has released its plan for teacher pay, there are three plans before lawmakers as they continue budget negotiations. Here are the basic differences:

Public-school officials are panicking ahead of state-mandated class-size reductions in kindergarten through third grade. School systems say lawmakers gave them an unfunded mandate when they demanded schools cut K-3 class sizes starting next school year.

Gov. Roy Cooper proposed average pay raises of 5 percent for teachers this year and next year in his upcoming budget. He made the announcement Monday at Collinswood Language Academy in Charlotte, surrounded by teachers.

Gov. Cooper says the two-year teacher pay raise will cost the state $813 million and he says taxes would not be raised to make it happen.

Over the past few years, teachers across North Carolina received highly publicized pay raises.

The increases were generally met with few objections and heralded as long overdue.

Left out of the press releases, however, was a shift that reduced teaching assistant positions, something that will hurt disadvantaged students across the state.


Jeremy Loeb/WCQS

NPR will be in Asheville on Tuesday February 7th for the latest 'Going There' event.  Weekend All Things Considered host Michel Martin will lead a night of performances and discussion on the topic 'What Happens When Your Hometown Gets Hot?' at the Diana Wortham Theater.  Tickets for the event have sold out but there will be a live stream that night to watch.  You can also join the conversation on Twitter by following @NPRMichel and @WCQS using the hashtag #HotHometown.

Many teachers across the state are set to get belated Christmas gifts in the form of merit bonuses, pending a vote this week by the state board of education.

General Assembly members approved nearly $14 million last year to reward teachers whose students showed growth in third-grade reading and passed advanced placement and international baccalaureate exams.

In the parking lot at East Cary Middle School, bus driver Auh-murel Wright walks down the aisle of her bus between rows of empty seats, checking the alarms and the emergency exits. She does this before each trip to make sure her ride is safe. And she knows the exact minute she can expect the first students to climb aboard—2:13 p.m.

Jeremy Loeb/WCQS

North Carolina Gubernatorial candidate Roy Cooper paid a visit to western North Carolina on Saturday.  The Democratic Attorney General addressed dozens of Democrats at the Fairview home of state Rep. John Ager in what was billed as a "candidates meet and greet."  WCQS’s Jeremy Loeb was there and has this report.

On this episode of the WUNCPolitics Podcast we focus on a single, perhaps defining, topic in the race for the next Governor: Pat McCrory's record on teacher pay. It’s an issue upon which he may very well be pinning his re-election hopes.

In their budget compromise, lawmakers have allocated millions of dollars to give certain teachers bonuses for how well their students perform. Top third-grade reading teachers would earn thousands of dollars extra, and Advanced Placement teachers would receive $50 for each of their students who passes an AP or other advanced test.

Editor's note: This story has been updated with the most recent action from the state Legislature.

State Senators approved a budget Tuesday night following more than an hour of review and debate.

There seems to be just one thing Pat McCrory and Roy Cooper agree on…they both think North Carolina is the best state. But when it comes to taxes and teacher pay, House Bill 2 and I-77 toll lanes, the two men vying to be North Carolina’s governor clashed in their first election-year debate.

House lawmakers have given final approval to a budget proposal. The plan passed its most important vote 103 to 12 Wednesday night with bipartisan support.