Rob Young

unfccc.int

Nearly 200 countries are wrapping up the annual United Nations Climate Summit in Bonn, Germany this week. Notably absent is the United States. This summer, President Trump declared he is pulling the U.S. out of the landmark Paris Climate Accord, which aims to reduce carbon emissions and holds countries accountable for limiting the rise in global temperatures.   But the move hasn’t stopped hundreds of climate scientists and researchers from participating, including Western Carolina University’s Rob Young, a geologist who directs The Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines.  Young spoke with BPR’s Helen Chickering shortly after he returned from Bonn.

We’ve become accustomed to hearing the one to five rating for hurricanes, but do you know what those categories mean?  BPR’s Helen Chickering set out to find the answer and talked to a local hurricane researcher who thinks the rating scale is misleading.

Wednesday, July 26, 2017

Sea levels are rising faster than anticipated and our state’s beaches are particularly vulnerable. Yet we have no long-term strategy to deal with this. Mike Collins talks with experts about what the future may hold.

Luke Shealy

Thousands of scientists and science supporters are expected to gather in Washington, and across the country – including Asheville for the March for Science.  The event has raised questions about whether scientists can and should advocate for public policy.   And as BPR’s Helen Chickering found out, there are some strong opinions here in Western North Carolina.

Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines at Western Carolina University

Rob Young: We definitely incentivize rebuilding at the moment.

Telescoped Sea Level Rise Report Released

May 7, 2015
Andrew Kemp, Yale University

The Science Panel of the Coastal Resources Commission has released a new sea level report.  The first report, released in 2010, looked 90 years down the road and predicted sea level along the North Carolina coast would rise as much as 39 inches As one might expect. developers, many property owners, and coastal area elected officials were critical of the report.  The North Carolina General Assembly responded by passing a law that blocked the use of the report in any new land use planning rules and regulations.