The Collider

globalchange.gov

If you suffer from allergies, you may have noticed you sneezed a little longer this fall.  But you may not have linked that extra sneezing to global warming.  Scientists and Public Health officials met in Asheville last week for a workshop on the climate health connection.  BPR’s Helen Chickering reports.

NPR/AP/NOAA

Recent hurricanes Irma and Harvey were a stark reminder of the catastrophic impacts of climate change.   But the words “climate change” have become so politically polarizing that some even avoid saying them.  In Asheville, that’s not the case. 

The topic of climate change just got hotter on the heels of President Trump’s decision to pull  the U.S.  from the Paris climate agreement.   Retired Navy Rear Admiral  David Titley  is an international expert on climate change and national security .  He’s giving a talk at the Collider in Asheville.

Matt Bush WCQS

NPR will be in Asheville on Tuesday February 7th for the latest 'Going There' event.  Weekend All Things Considered host Michel Martin will lead a night of performances and discussion on the topic 'What Happens When Your Hometown Gets Hot?' at the Diana Wortham Theater.  Tickets for the event have sold out but there will be a live stream that night to watch.  You can also join the conversation on Twitter by following @NPRMichel and @WCQS using the hashtag #HotHometown.

WCQS

Asheville has been dubbed Beer City,  Bee City and even Climate City.  In the future, Dog City may be added to that title.  A local dog behavior specialist is on a mission to make the area the most dog friendly place in the country. 

But this isn’t a campaign to encourage more water bowls and dog biscuits, it’s about retraining people.  WCQS’s Helen Chickering explains.

Kim Brophey, “I’ve got the Elmo voice down,   Look at the little puppy!”

HC: That’s what I do                                                                                                       

David Liu

Andrew Jones is co-director of Climate Interactive, a non-profit international group with employees housed in Asheville's Collider climate change innovation center.    He stopped by WCQS a few weeks after the election of Donald Trump to speak with Jeremy Loeb about the group's work and what he called his hopeful outlook as many in the industry are concerned about having a so-called "climate denier" in the White House.  

Jeremy Loeb/WCQS

Environmental groups are worried about what a Trump presidency means for our changing climate.  But for the climate change innovation center The Collider, its effort to foster private sector climate change solutions could take on greater significance if the government falls behind.  Donald Trump has promised to relax environmental rules, pull the U.S. out of the Paris climate accord, and called climate change a "hoax" perpetrated by China.  

Chelsea Clinton visited Asheville on Wednesday to talk about clean energy at The Collider downtown.  Collider CEO James McMahon spoke with WCQS's Jeremy Loeb before the event.  You can hear that interview above and click here for the full report on Clinton's Asheville visit. 

Jeremy Loeb/WCQS

Western North Carolina saw another high profile visit of this campaign season yesterday when Chelsea Clinton visited downtown.  Clinton’s visit to Asheville was all about global warming.  And the world isn’t the only thing heating up.  So too is the presidential race, very much so in North Carolina.  The visit came one day after her mom Hillary Clinton made Raleigh her first campaign stop following Monday’s presidential debate.  Donald Trump and his running mate Mike Pence have made numerous stops in the state in recent weeks as well.

TIGHAR

 

  

   An Asheville climate scientist is preparing for an expedition to the remote islands of the central Pacific where he’ll study the environment - and work to help solve one of history’s most famous aviation mysteries – the disappearance of Amelia Earhart. 

Earhart, first woman to pilot a plane across the Atlantic Ocean, mysteriously disappeared while flying over the Pacific in 1937.