Arts & Performance

Tony Nagelmann / NPR

WCQS is bringing Wait Wait… Don’t Tell Me! the oddly informative news quiz from NPR back to Asheville August 1st. Tickets went on sale at 10 am June 6th and are almost sold out as of Friday afternoon, June 7th! Get yours before they're gone!

WNC Teacher Named Yale Distinguished Educator

Jun 5, 2013

An Asheville Public School teacher has been named a recipient of the Yale University Distinguished Music Educator award.  David  Hurand spoke with Ruben Orengo about the honor and his career as a musician and teacher.

Tony Nagelmann / NPR

WCQS is bringing Wait Wait… Don’t Tell Me! The Oddly Informative News Quiz from NPR back to Asheville this summer. Host Peter Sagal, official judge and scorekeeper Carl Kasell and a few of their [yet to be named] witty panelists will return to the 'Cesspool of Sin' for a live show at the Thomas Wolfe Auditorium August 1st. The Asheville performance will be broadcast nationwide on Saturday, August 3rd.

Tailgate Market Report

May 9, 2013

WCQS partners with ASAP -- the Appalachian Sustainable Agriculture Project -- for tailgate market updates, heard Thursdays and Fridays during Morning Edition (5am - 9am). 

Associate springtime with fresh peas? You're right! Shell peas, snow peas and snap peas (or sugarsnaps) can be found at area tailgate markets now. The season will continue through early summer. Also look for a small selection of green beans, and possibly even a few fava beans.

Moogfest Will Be Back In 2014!

Apr 10, 2013
Rich Orris

 Moog Music has announced dates for its next electronic music festival and its' new co-producer.

David Hurand spoke with the Asheville based company's Senior Brand Manager Emmy Parker.

Tony Kiss takes a look at the weekend entertainment scene. High on his list, The Odd Couple at Flat Rock Playhouse, music at the Altamont and a couple of new movies and The Life of Pi in 3D.

Brent Manning is a maltster on a mission. The co-founder of Riverbend Malt House in Asheville, N.C., wants people to be able to taste local grains in North Carolina's beers, just as vino aficionados can identify the provenance of fine wines.

"In the wine industry ... they will tell you that the No. 1 Syrah grape grows on this hillside over here because it's a bit rockier," Manning explains. "It's that very same connection to the soil and the underlying geology that creates these nuances in flavors."

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