The State of Things | Blue Ridge Public Radio

M - F Noon - 1PM

The State of Things host Frank Statio
Credit WUNC-FM

WUNC’s flagship program, “The State of Things” covers many diverse issues and topics in North Carolina. Host Frank Stasio talks with authors, musicians, politicians, policymakers and everyday citizens about subjects that matter to North Carolinians. The program can now be heard in Western North Carolina, M - F from noon to 1, thanks to an ongoing partnership between Blue Ridge Public Radio and WUNC, headquartered in Chapel Hill.

The State of Things is a live show that welcomes comments, feedback and questions from listeners. Call 1.877.962.9862, email sot@wunc.org, or tweet @state_of_things. Follow The State of Things on Facebook or Tumblr.

Get a daily show update, and special news.

Or, join the live audience for remote broadcasts from Greensboro's Triad Stage and Raleigh's Museum of Natural Sciences. And you can listen to Political Junkie Ken Rudin Fridays on the program.

The State Ethics Commission is a small group of officials that has the large task of looking out for public corruption. 

Commissioners investigate everything from public officials’ investments to possible conflicts of interest in state government. But a 2012 report gave North Carolina a “C” when it comes to ethics enforcement. 

  

The Ciompi Quartet, Duke University's resident string quartet, opens its fall season September 20th at Baldwin Auditorium with guest pianist Awadagin Pratt

Climate change will likely alter the migratory routes and habitats of more than half of the birds in North America, according to new study published by the National Audubon Society.

The State of Things is broadcasting live from the Museum of Natural Sciences in Raleigh. Watch here:

  

Stink bugs, moths, fireflies, and caterpillars are just a few of the creepy crawlers featured at Bugfest, a showcase of more than 100 exhibits about an array of arthropods at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences.

Honking horns, slamming doors and congested streets: these are the sounds and sites of a bustling city. 

    

In 2011, state lawmakers noticed a discrepancy in North Carolina’s correctional facilities: crime was going down, but the prison population was booming. The culprit? The state’s probation laws.

    

At the end of the 18th century it was very common for women to die during childbirth. 

A new play premiering at Raleigh's Theatre In The Park encourages viewers to question their notions of love, truth and sexuality. 

Triad News Update

Sep 16, 2014

    

The Winston-Salem city government is now offering benefits to same-sex partners who are married. 

Matisse And His Muses

Sep 16, 2014

French artist Henri Matisse was known for his use of color and his fluid and original draftsmanship. 

Music by the Durham-based Wowolfol band is difficult to describe. 


When Alice Gerrard was a child, music was just a fun social activity with her family. Little did she know that she would become one of the female pioneers of bluegrass and folk music. Her collaboration with Hazel Dickens in the 1960s produced anthems for the women’s rights and labor movements.   

  Governor Pat McCrory says there are big problems with legislature’s approach to Duke Energy’s coal ash cleanup.  He will not sign the measures they passed, but he will let them become law. He is expected to challenge them later.

  

Sean Strub is best known as the founder of POZ magazine and the first openly HIV-positive person to run for Congress. 

Delta Rae has made it back home to North Carolina.

  

President Obama addressed the nation with a four-part plan to expand the military campaign against the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria, better known as the Islamic State or ISIS.

  

  

    

The people of Scotland will vote next week on whether to become an independent country. 

Think you know everything about The Cosby Show? Test your knowledge with this quiz: 

    

In hearings yesterday, state lawmakers questioned the Department of Health and Human Services' hiring of an outside contracting firm without a bid process.

  

After World War II, President Harry Truman was being approached on all sides about building a Jewish state in Palestine. 

The pro-Israel lobby was pushing for its own sovereign nation, but Truman was leaning toward a two-state solution while his State Department said the British should keep control of Palestine. 

 The nation’s gap between conservatives and liberals is ever widening and this division is personal for one set of North Carolina brothers. 

Brad Woodhouse led communications for the Democratic party. Dallas Woodhouse ran the state’s chapter of the Koch-funded Americans for Prosperity.

At the beginning of the Civil War, members of Abraham Lincoln’s administration were scrambling to build a strategy against the newly formed Confederate Army. 

But they soon became aware of an unforeseen threat to their military operations: female spies. 

Hundreds of women moved goods and information across enemy lines in what would be a gender turning point in a bitterly divided country. 

Artist Stacey Kirby transformed CAM Raleigh’s Media Lab into the “Bureau of Personal Belonging”—a series of interactive performance art installations that explore themes of belonging, identity and validity. 

Hana Pichova grew up under a totalitarian regime in Czechoslovakia during the 1970s. 

For Pichova, opportunities for learning and discovery were rare under the control of the communist government.

At 18, she and her parents fled to Switzerland. Pichova decided she wanted to  immigrate to America. Unbeknownst to her parents, she went to the German border to seek political asylum. When they learned of her move, they decided to follow her, despite their reservations. 

  Singing in the Rain. West Side Story. Grease. These wildly popular musicals became big hits on the silver screen as well. 

Alzheimer’s disease is still a poorly understood illness, not only in the way it develops, but also how it affects caregivers. 

It is now the sixth leading cause of death in the United States, but advocates say Alzheimer’s research does not get the time or money it needs.

So, the play “Surviving Grace,” is trying to fill that gap. It’s a bittersweet comedy that follows a TV producer whose mother’s memory is slowly fading, and it has been touring around the country, raising funds and awareness. 

A cast of local celebrities will be reading from the play tonight at 7 p.m. in the North Carolina Museum of History. The actors include Gov. Pat McCrory, TV star Loni Anderson, and public radio’s own Diane Rehm.

Democratic U.S. Senator Kay Hagan squared off with her Republican challenger, North Carolina House Speaker Thom Tillis in their first senatorial debate last night.

The race is essentially neck and neck with two months left before midterm elections. Tillis attempted to tie Hagan to an unpopular president, while Hagan tried to associate Tillis with an unpopular legislature. 

This year marks the 10th anniversary of the American Tobacco Historic Campus revitalization in downtown Durham. The businesses and retail stores occupy a space that was once the epicenter of the tobacco industry. 

Host Frank Stasio talks with former American Tobacco employee Richard Clements about the rise, fall and rebirth of the area.

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