Tom Bullock

Tom Bullock decided to trade the khaki clad masses and traffic of Washington DC for Charlotte in 2014. Before joining WFAE, Tom spent 15 years working for NPR.  Over that time he served as everything from an intern to senior producer of NPR’s Election Unit.  Tom also spent five years as the senior producer of NPR’s Foreign Desk where he produced and reported from Iraq, Afghanistan, Yemen, Haiti, Egypt, Libya, Lebanon among others.  Tom is looking forward to finally convincing his young daughter, Charlotte, that her new hometown was not, in fact, named after her.

Late Wednesday, a 5th bill to repeal HB 2 was filed at the General Assembly. But this bill stands out from the others. It is the only measure sponsored by both Democrats and Republicans.

House Bill 186 was reportedly hammered out between two Democrats and two Republicans. However, at least five other Republicans have signed on as sponsors. Representative Craig Horn of Union County is one of them.

For the second time, a North Carolina Senate committee has attempted to hold a confirmation hearing for a member of Governor Roy Cooper's cabinet. And, for the second time, that attempt has failed.

It seems our Democratic governor and GOP-controlled state Senate are playing a game of chicken, with each betting the other side will flinch on the confirmation process.

The North Carolina House passed a bill Wednesday that would make District and Superior Court races partisan. In other words, judicial candidates would have their party affiliation appear on the ballot.

The vote was unusual, 65 to 51, with Democrats and Republicans voting for and against the measure.

Proponents argue that listing a party affiliation next to a judicial candidate’s name on the ballot provides voters with needed information.

Since 2002 all judicial elections in North Carolina have been considered non-partisan races. Which means the candidates party affiliation does not appear on the ballot.

Over the last few months the General Assembly has been changing that. And Monday, a bill which would finalize the process was passed by a committee in the State House.

Chairman of the North Carolina Republican Party Dallas Woodhouse had to issue a mea culpa over the weekend. It came after he tweeted an offensive article calling transgender students "pervs" and "mentally ill."

North Carolina is one of just four states expecting to see a budget surplus this year. And it is a significant figure. The non-partisan state Fiscal Research Division projects 552 million extra dollars will flow into North Carolina’s coffers.

The budget debates are still months away. But one proposal for some of that extra money is up for a vote next week.

On Thursday, two bills were introduced in the North Carolina House which would repeal HB 2.

On Wednesday, the Republican leaders of the North Carolina Senate defied a court order and attempted to hold a confirmation hearing for one of Governor Roy Cooper’s cabinet appointees.

The attempt failed. And WFAE’s Tom Bullock joins Lisa Worf with details.

The North Carolina General Assembly did something today they haven’t done all year. They voted on legislation. 

On Wednesday, a North Carolina Senate committee was scheduled to do something of a first: confirm a member of a governor’s cabinet.

However, late Tuesday night a three-judge panel appears to have issued a temporary order to halt the proceeding.

A member of the North Carolina Sports Association has sent a letter to state lawmakers with this warning, North Carolina is on the brink of losing out on all NCAA championships for the next six years unless something is done about House Bill 2.

On Monday, North Carolina’s General Assembly will begin another week of work.

The long session was gaveled in last month – but so far lawmakers have yet to cast a single vote on a single bill.

So are they off to a slow start? Or just getting warmed up?

The above headline is not ours – it’s from an article in Slate written by Richard Hasen, an election law expert and professor at UC Irvine School of Law. Hasen also writes the Election Law Blog.  

President Donald Trump’s executive order temporarily banning refugees and citizens of seven Muslim countries from entering the U.S. has done much more than spur airport protests over the weekend.

One expert on Islamic extremists is warning the move has revitalized a dangerous narrative. 

The North Carolina General Assembly is now back from its January break. And during this session, one Mecklenburg County Republican senator says he will introduce a bill to protect former elected officials from angry protesters. But opponents say it would infringe on First Amendment rights.

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