Jeremy Loeb

Reporter & Morning Edition Host

Jeremy Loeb is a reporter and host of Morning Edition on WCQS. He joined the station in December 2014.

Jeremy grew up in Durham, North Carolina. He got his start in radio as an intern at WHQR Public Radio in Wilmington, NC while attending the University of North Carolina Wilmington. He was an operations assistant, host of All Things Considered, and was one of a rotating roster of hosts for an eclectic half-hour music program during his six years there. He then spent two years back near his hometown, living in Carrboro, NC while working for North Carolina Public Radio – WUNC. He was a reporter, a Morning Edition producer, and backup host for All Things Considered.

After two years, Jeremy moved to Washington D.C. and drove a pedicab on the National Mall and volunteered on various political campaigns. He returned to WHQR briefly after a year to be their All Things Considered host. He then joined Alabama Public Radio in Tuscaloosa as a reporter and Morning Edition host. He was there until moving to downtown Asheville and beginning work at WCQS.

Jeremy was also a producer for two years on A Season’s Griot, out of Wilmington, the only nationally-syndicated Kwanzaa program in the country, and filled in for a short time as a producer on WUNC’s local affairs program The State of Things, which is now aired on WCQS weekdays at noon. He likes reading and drinking coffee at Battery Park Book Exchange, and he’s happiest when he’s riding his bike and blasting indie music in his headphones.

Ways to Connect

Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images via NPR.org

A bill passed by the North Carolina House of Representatives that would protect drivers who injure protesters with their car while "exercising due care" is getting renewed attention in the wake of last weekend's deadly Virginia protests.  

Pisgah Legal Services

"They don't have anywhere else to turn."  Pisgah Legal Services executive director Jim Barrett was referring to the roughly 2,000 people that could lose access to their services due to cuts in the state budget.  Pisgah Legal Services is one of three aid groups across the state that will feel the impacts of the cuts.

Jeremy Loeb/BPR

Western North Carolina Congressman Mark Meadows, chairman of the conservative Freedom Caucus, held a town hall Monday in Flat Rock.  Here is the nearly full audio (with two edits, due to equipment) from the town hall.  

Our previous report on the town hall is here.  

NASA TV

This week, BPR gardening expert Alison Arnold talks about the solar eclipse and the ways light affects plants.

Jeremy Loeb/BPR

Western North Carolina Republican Congressman Mark Meadows met face to face with supporters and detractors during a town hall debate last night near Hendersonville that was largely dominated by health care.  BPR’s Jeremy Loeb was there.

Jeff Tiberii/WUNC

Legislators are heading back to Raleigh Thursday for a special session, but it's unclear exactly what's on the agenda.  Veto overrides were originally cited as the main reason.  Now those appear to be off the table for the moment as not enough lawmakers are expected to be in attendance.  Instead, they could consider bills not taken up in the long session.  Hanging over it all is a tight deadline for correcting illegal legislative maps, and the potential for surprises.  WUNC capitol reporter Jeff Tiberii spoke with BPR's Jeremy Loeb about what's in store.  

U.S. House of Representatives

Updated 7/31 1:10pm:  Congressman Patrick McHenry say he was diagnosed with pneumonia on Saturday morning and is cancelling his Tuesday town hall in Swannanoa.  Meanwhile, WNC's other Congressman, Mark Meadows has announced his own town hall planned for next Monday:

Details:
Rep. Meadows’ Town Hall

August 7, 2017  

6:00pm-8:00pm

Blue Ridge Community College

Bo Thomas Auditorium

180 W. Campus Drive

Flat Rock, NC 28731

Original Post:

Jeremy Loeb/BPR

Updated Tuesday 7/25 7:23pm:  The Asheville City Council approved Sunday alcohol sales unanimously, meaning restaurants and bars can start serving drinks at 10am rather than the previous noon start time.  The original story is below.

National Park Service

This week, BPR gardening expert Alison Arnold tells us about an invasive pest, the emerald ash borer.

Jeremy Loeb/BPR

With lawmakers home from Raleigh, Western Carolina University political scientist Dr. Chris Cooper stopped by for one of our regular chats taking the temperature of politics in Raleigh and Washington.  He spoke with BPR's Jeremy Loeb.

Jon Ostendorff/Asheville Citizen-Times

2 1/2 years on the job, Buncombe County District Attorney Todd Williams stopped by for a one-on-one conversaton with BPR's Jeremy Loeb.

A new book looking at North Carolina's job market shows that it's growing, but so to is the divide between high and low paying jobs.

Jeremy Loeb/BPR

Speaking to BPR a day after the legislature passed a bill forcing districts for Asheville city council members, mayor Esther Manheimer said there is a legal strategy in place to deal with them.  Manheimer said the issue would need to be discussed at the next council meeting on July 25th.

rooseveltinstitute.org

1.34 million North Carolinians could lose health insurance if the Senate health care bill became law, according to the liberal think-tank the Center for American Progress.  The group evaluated numbers by the non-partisan Congressional Budget Office that found 22 million Americans could lose health coverage under the Senate plan to repeal the Affordable Care Act.

SOGGY6 / FLICKR

The long-debated Asheville districts bill is now law.  The North Carolina House passed the bill forcing districts for Asheville city council members, and the Senate quickly concurred.  It passed despite the lone Asheville Democrat in favor withdrawing his support after it was amended.

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