Jeremy Loeb

Reporter & Morning Edition Host

Jeremy Loeb is a reporter and host of Morning Edition on WCQS. He joined the station in December 2014.

Jeremy grew up in Durham, North Carolina. He got his start in radio as an intern at WHQR Public Radio in Wilmington, NC while attending the University of North Carolina Wilmington. He was an operations assistant, host of All Things Considered, and was one of a rotating roster of hosts for an eclectic half-hour music program during his six years there. He then spent two years back near his hometown, living in Carrboro, NC while working for North Carolina Public Radio – WUNC. He was a reporter, a Morning Edition producer, and backup host for All Things Considered.

After two years, Jeremy moved to Washington D.C. and drove a pedicab on the National Mall and volunteered on various political campaigns. He returned to WHQR briefly after a year to be their All Things Considered host. He then joined Alabama Public Radio in Tuscaloosa as a reporter and Morning Edition host. He was there until moving to downtown Asheville and beginning work at WCQS.

Jeremy was also a producer for two years on A Season’s Griot, out of Wilmington, the only nationally-syndicated Kwanzaa program in the country, and filled in for a short time as a producer on WUNC’s local affairs program The State of Things, which is now aired on WCQS weekdays at noon. He likes reading and drinking coffee at Battery Park Book Exchange, and he’s happiest when he’s riding his bike and blasting indie music in his headphones.

Ways to Connect

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Details of the North Carolina House budget have emerged as lawmakers try for quicker passage of a completed 2 year spending plan.  WUNC capitol reporter Jeff Tiberii joined me from WUNC's Durham studio to talk about how the budget differs from the Senate version, and for the latest in North Carolina politics.  

Harry Lynch, News & Observer

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday that two North Carolina Congressional districts are illegal because race factored too heavily in their drawing.  The 5-3 ruling is the latest in a string of defeats for the Republican-controlled General Assembly.  It comes just weeks after the court declined to hear an appeal of the state's invalidated voter ID law.  The Reverend William Barber II is head of the state NAACP, which helped bring the lawsuit against the districts.  He spoke with BPR's Jeremy Loeb about the ruling.  

Jeremy Loeb/BPR

Western Carolina University political scientist Dr. Chris Cooper is a frequent guest of Blue Ridge Public Radio.  In his most recent visit, Cooper spoke with BPR's Jeremy Loeb and Matt Bush about the latest in state politics.  The conversation touched on the recently-passed Senate budget, a big Supreme Court punt on voter ID, the brewing (pun intended) legal battle involving craft beer, possible campaign finance mischief, Senator Richard Burr's role in the national spotlight, and some high-profile resignations for the progressive left in North Carolina.  

Jeremy Loeb/BPR

Chris Sgro, the leader of the state LGBT rights group Equality NC, has announced he's stepping down at the end of May after nearly four years with the group.  He's taking a job with the national gay rights group Human Rights Campaign.  He'll be their communications director.  Sgro spoke with BPR about his time with ENC and about the bill that partly repealed HB2.

Asheville Citizen-Times

Employees of Montreat College are speaking out against a covenant that includes anti-gay marriage and anti-abortion language.  The college is requiring employees to sign it and some have chosen to resign.  Several of them told us why. 

ncstatesenate.com

A complaint filed by the left-leaning group Democracy NC alleges Republican Senator Ralph Hise of Spruce Pine broke campaign disclosure laws.  Among the complaints are that Hise pocketed around $10,000 from his campaign, failed to disclose PAC contributions and didn't properly disclose information about his donors.  Hise has yet to respond to a request from BPR for comment.

Alison Arnold - Bats!

May 4, 2017
Jeremy Loeb/BPR

Poor Jeremy had quite the night a few weeks back when a bat got into his apartment and was looking scary, flying around, and generally doing bat things.  BPR gardening expert Alison Arnold thought Jeremy's misfortune was a great excuse to talk about the benefits of the little creatures.

Wikimedia Commons

This was "crossover week" at the North Carolina legislature, a busy time for lawmakers (and journalists).  It's a self-imposed deadline, when a majority of the bills put forth by lawmakers must pass at least one chamber or be considered dead for the remainder of the session.  BPR's Jeremy Loeb spoke with WUNC capitol reporter Jeff Tiberii, who's been putting in the long hours in Raleigh.    They spoke on Friday, the day after crossover deadline.  

Soggy6/Flickr

The North Carolina Senate passed a controversial bill Wednesday night that splits Asheville into six districts for the purpose of electing city council members.   Senate Bill 285 is similar to one put forward by Hendersonville Republican Senator Tom Apodaca.  It would change the way voters choose city council members by creating six districts with voters allowed to choose only in their districts.  The mayor would still be elected at-large.  Apodaca’s bill died when a number of Republicans joined Democrats in voting no.  Now Apodaca’s successor, Republican Chuck Edwards, is trying again.

ncleg.net

A bill that would carve Asheville into districts for the purpose of electing city council members passed its first committee Tuesday night.  The controversial measure is opposed by most Asheville-area lawmakers, as well as city council members and the mayor.  Its sponsor is Republican Senator Chuck Edwards of Hendersonville, who represents a small part of south Asheville.  The bill mandates the city draw up 6 districts for electing council members.  Voters in those districts could vote for only those running in their district.  The mayor would still be elected at-large.

pro.com

This week, BPR gardening expert Alison Arnold explains when, how, and even whether to fertilize gardens.

Jeremy Loeb/WCQS

Four North Carolina Republicans are taking a symbolic swipe at gay marriage, introducing a measure rejecting a U.S. Supreme Court decision legalizing same-sex unions in every state.  Bryson City Republican Mike Clampitt is among them.

Jeremy Loeb/BPR

With lawmakers back in Raleigh, we’re speaking with some of those members from out here in the west.  Today, John Ager, a Democrat of Buncombe County.  Ager is a farmer out of Fairview serving his second term in the North Carolina House.  This is the full interview intended for use on the BPR News Smartphone App.  See the full post here.

Jeremy Loeb/BPR

With lawmakers back in Raleigh, we’re speaking with some of those members from out here in the west.  Today, John Ager, a Democrat of Buncombe County.  Ager is a farmer out of Fairview serving his second term in the North Carolina House.


Jeremy Loeb/WCQS

Impact fees are imposed by cities and counties on developers to help pay for infrastructure costs associated with new development.  For example, if a hotel is built a city or county might impose a fee to help pay for any necessary traffic lights, roads, water needs, etc.  HB436 would outlaw the practice.  It was filed by the powerful House Speaker Pro Tem Sarah Stevens of Mt. Airy.  Its only other co-sponsor is Bryson City Republican Mike Clampitt.

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