Jeremy Loeb

Reporter & Morning Edition Host

Jeremy Loeb is a reporter and host of Morning Edition on BPR News & BPR Classic. He joined the station in December 2014.

Jeremy grew up in Durham, North Carolina. He got his start in radio as an intern at WHQR Public Radio in Wilmington, NC while attending the University of North Carolina Wilmington. He was an operations assistant, host of All Things Considered, and was one of a rotating roster of hosts for an eclectic half-hour music program during his six years there. He then spent two years back near his hometown, living in Carrboro, NC while working for North Carolina Public Radio – WUNC. He was a reporter, a Morning Edition producer, and backup host for All Things Considered.

After two years, Jeremy moved to Washington D.C. and drove a pedicab on the National Mall and volunteered on various political campaigns. He returned to WHQR briefly after a year to be their All Things Considered host. He then joined Alabama Public Radio in Tuscaloosa as a reporter and Morning Edition host. He was there until moving to downtown Asheville and beginning work at Blue Ridge Public Radio.

Jeremy was also a producer for two years on A Season’s Griot, out of Wilmington, the only nationally-syndicated Kwanzaa program in the country, and filled in for a short time as a producer on WUNC’s local affairs program The State of Things, which is now aired on BPR News & BPR Classic weekdays at noon. He likes reading and drinking coffee at Battery Park Book Exchange, and he’s happiest when he’s riding his bike and blasting indie music in his headphones.

Ways to Connect

Jeremy Loeb/BPR

Controversial legislation forcing the city of Asheville to have districts for city council members could pick up the support of Buncombe County Democratic Senator Terry Van Duyn if the bill is amended on the Senate floor.  An elections committee advanced SB813 this morning.  Van Duyn says the bill will be on the Senate floor on Monday.

Jeremy Loeb/BPR

Western Carolina University political scientist Chris Cooper spoke with BPR's Jeremy Loeb about the latest in North Carolina politics.  This week saw a major U.S. Supreme Court "punt" on political gerrymandering, a flurry of election changes pushed by Republican state lawmakers amid a process that's drawn criticism for a lack of transparency, and the Trump administration's policy of separating immigrant children from their parents at the border draws a response from local politicians. 

Jeremy Loeb/BPR

Anticipated legislation forcing the city of Asheville to have districts for city council members has been officially filed.  Republican Senator Chuck Edwards of Hendersonville filed the bill mandating 5 city council districts.  One council member would be elected at large.  The mayor would still be elected at large.  The move towards districts was opposed by all other state lawmakers representing Buncombe County, as well as the Asheville city council and a large majority of Asheville voters in a Nov

WUSF

North Carolina Republicans are proposing changes to early voting, including doing away with the popular last Saturday before the election.  The House gave final approval to the measure 61-40 Friday.  It now goes to the House.  Rollout of the proposal, Senate Bill 325, prompted an emergency meeting of the North Carolina State Board of Elections and Ethics Enforcment.  The board's chairman Andy Penry said they had no input in the bill and received less than a day's notice of it.  The House also quickly passed HB717 with little debate, which makes a slew of changes to judicial districts statewide.

abeka.com

A new study put out by the League of Women Voters finds the vast majority of schools taking in students receiving vouchers are teaching a biblical worldview.  Many of those schools are using what's called the Abeka Curriculum, which teaches students the earth was created 6,000 years ago, that climate change is a hoax, and refers to media as the "liberal press," according to study author Bonnie Bechard.  She spoke with BPR's Jeremy Loeb.

ncleg.net

Local sentiment is overwhelmingly against the legislature creating districts for Asheville city council.  Comments solicited by the legislature and obtained by BPR were negative on the prospects of districts, often scathingly so. 

You can read the comments here.  BPR removed names and addresses from the document.  

Jeff Tiberii/WUNC

North Carolina Democrats held a news conference Tuesday blasting state Republicans for their process of adjusting the 2-year budget without allowing amendments.  Democrat Darren Jackson of Wake County is the House minority leader.

"The public had no involvement.  Our caucus had no involvement.  Many in the other caucus had no involvement.... You have a budget that was written by a few insiders and lobbyists behind closed doors."

Jeremy Loeb/BPR

North Carolina Democrats are calling on the legislature to raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2022.  They plan to re-introduce legislation that stalled in the long session that would raise the minimum wage in phases over five years.  Buncombe County Rep. Susan Fisher is among the Democrats taking the lead on the effort.

Jeremy Loeb/BPR

Two Buncombe County Democrats took the lead in laying out the Democratic agenda in one of 6 news conferences held across the state.  BPR's Jeremy Loeb reports it primarily centered on expansion of Medicaid.

waynegoodwin.org

The North Carolina Democratic Party filed a complaint with the Federal Elections Commission against Republican Senator Thom Tillis and the state Republican party over their involvement with data-collection company Cambridge Analytica.  BPR's Jeremy Loeb spoke with North Carolina Democratic Party Chairman Wayne Goodwin about it.

Mountain XPress

Buncombe County Democratic Senator Terry Van Duyn was sharply critical of a committee looking at changes to North Carolina's judiciary Friday.  The Joint Select Committee On Judicial Reform and Redistricting looked at proposals for new maps for judges.  They also discussed proposals to take the power of vacancy appointments away from Democratic Governor Roy Cooper and give it to the Republican-dominated General Assembly.  Towards the end of the t

Jeremy Loeb/BPR

Asheville City Council member Vijay Kapoor was critical of the North Carolina legislature for moving towards forcing districts on the city of Asheville.  Speaking with BPR's Jeremy Loeb, the councilman of south Asheville said his election shows that voters from anywhere in the city are fully capable of being represented on council under the current system.  And he added that voters overwhelmingly rejected the idea of districts in a voter referendum.

(Photo: North Carolina General Assembly, Information Systems Division) via Asheville Citizen-Times

The General Assembly is seeking input on drawing districts for Asheville City Council members.  There’s now a form on the legislative website that lets residents weigh in on criteria for the maps.  The idea is controversial.  It was put forward by Republican Senator Chuck Edwards of Hendersonville over the objections of all other state lawmakers representing Buncombe County.  Asheville voters overwhelmingly rejected the idea in a local referendum after the legislature passed Edward’s bill.

Matt Bush

Early voting begins Thursday for the May primaries.  Among the races on the ballot this year is Buncombe County district attorney.  BPR’s Jeremy Loeb interviewed both candidates running for the office.

Jeremy Loeb/BPR

Recently released data from Duke Energy is raising new concerns about contaminated water at the Asheville coal plant and others around the state.  BPR’s Jeremy Loeb reports groundwater at the Asheville plant had levels of radioactivity 38 times the federal safety standard.

ASHEVILLE CITIZEN TIMES/ASHEVILLE POLICE DEPARTMENT

Leaked video of an Asheville police officer beating an unarmed black man accused of jaywalking has brought renewed attention to the North Carolina law regarding the release of police body cam footage.  Lauren Horsch of NC Insider reports the Asheville incident is being cited by the law's critics as an example of its weaknesses.  She spoke with BPR's Jeremy Loeb.

Jeremy Loeb/BPR

North Carolina Attorney General Josh Stein sent a letter to U.S. Department of Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen looking for information on election security in North Carolina.  This comes on the heels of last week's indictments by special counsel Robert Mueller of 13 Russian nationals and 3 Russian businesses for interfering in the 2016 election.  Stein joined BPR's Jeremy Loeb to discuss that and other matters.

Public Schools First NC

The North Carolina legislature is adjourned until May.  Or are they?  BPR's Jeremy Loeb and Western Carolina University political scientist Chris Cooper talk about the latest in North Carolina politics, from a loaded class-size bill critics call a "poison pill" to a stand-off over Gen-X, the latest in the neverending gerrymandering saga, and the 2018 midterms.  

Jeremy Loeb/BPR

Buncombe County Democrats showed a united front as candidate filing began.  The four Asheville-area legislators, Democrats John Ager, Susan Fisher, Brian Turner and Terry Van Duyn filed for re-election together as filing got underway at noon Monday at the Buncombe County elections office.  Reps. Ager and Turner are likely to have competitive elections in 2018.  Rep. Fisher and Sen. Van Duyn are in districts more favorable to Democrats.  Fisher noted the strong presence of women candidates running in Buncombe County and statewide.  

BEN GRAUMANN, EQUALITY NC

A column last year in the News & Observer of Raleigh declared "North Carolina is no longer classified as a democracy."  The article went viral and prompted a range of heated reactions, even death threats.  The writer, Andrew Reynolds, a professor of political science at UNC Chapel Hill, recently updated us to say things had only gotten worse.  He joined BPR's Jeremy Loeb and WUNC's Jeff Tiberii to discuss.  

Chris Seward; News & Observer of Raleigh

A likely Republican candidate for governor in 2020 accepted a campaign contribution from the leader of the controversial Word of Faith Fellowship in Spindale, the News & Observer reports.  The paper says campaign finance reports show Lt. Governor Dan Forest accepted $100 contributions from six Word of Faith pastors, including leader Jane Whaley.

Jeremy Loeb/BPR

It’s a new year, and for many people, that means new fitness goals.  BPR’s Jeremy Loeb checked in at the local YMCA to see how things were going.

BEN GRAUMANN, EQUALITY NC

The Joint Select Committee on Judicial Reform and Redistricting met again Monday to discuss changes to the courts.  Possible changes include redistricting for judges and a "merit-selection" process that could bypass voters altogether.  Democrats argue Republicans are trying to rig the courts in their favor after seeing a number of decisions go against them.  Republicans say the changes are long overdue.  

BPR recorded the meeting in full.  

Ben Graumann, Equality NC

Updated Thursday 4pm 

A highly anticipated judiciary committee meeting was held Thursday afternoon.  For nearly 3 hours, Senate and House lawmakers discussed various merit selection proposals as well as new district maps for judges.  Democrats were skeptical of the GOP plans, especially considering the number of maps drawn for legislative and Congressional members that heavily favored Republicans.

WRAL

Friday update:

(Associated Press) The North Carolina House leader predicts redrawn election districts for trial court judges can be finalized with Senate Republicans by the end of January. But he's unsure what his colleagues think about a Senate proposal eliminating head-to-head judicial elections.

House Speaker Tim Moore and Senate leader Phil Berger appointed Thursday members of a special bipartisan joint committee tasked with recommending judicial changes to the General Assembly.

Pexels

The Buncombe County Tax Office says it's experiencing long lines this week as residents try to pre-pay their 2018 property tax bills.  This is in response to the tax bill passed by Congress and signed into law by President Donald Trump.  That bill imposes a $10-thousand combined limit on the deduction of state and local income and property taxes.  There is no limit for this year.  The Buncombe County Tax Office says while residents can prepay to avoid that deduction limit for next year, it's likely that it won't qualify for a deduction since the county does not generate official 2018 prope

plasticsoupfoundation.org

Updated 6:00am 12/21:  The Metropolitan Sewerage District has voted down a proposal to expand its board with 3 seats for Henderson County.  The 10-1 vote reflected the belief of board members that giving Henderson the same number of seats as Asheville would create an imbalance because Asheville customers make up a majority of those served.  There's also lingering mistrust after the state legislature tried to take over the Asheville water system and turn it over to MSD. 

Associated Press

Multiple news agencies report Tennessee Senator Bob Corker has sent a letter to Utah Sen. Orrin Hatch asking how and why a provision was included in the GOP tax bill that could benefit Corker and President Donald Trump.  The International Business Times first reported the provision that would reduce taxes on income from real-estate LLCs.  Corker and President Trump own a large amount of real estate.  

Jeremy Loeb/BPR

The Washington Post published an article this week looking at North Carolina's moves on taxes in recent years for clues to how the GOP tax plan making its way through Congress could impact the country.  BPR's Jeremy Loeb was joined by WUNC capitol reporter Jeff Tiberii and Western Carolina Univeristy political scientist Chris Cooper for a discussion of North Carolina's example with regards to taxes.

YouTube

Senate Republicans in Congress could vote on their version of tax reform as soon as this week.  If the Senate bill passes, it would need to be reconciled with the House version and then voted on again.  There are still a number of Senate Republicans who have expressed reservations.  They can only lose two votes for the bill to still pass without any Democratic support.  BPR's Jeremy Loeb discusses its impact in Western North Carolina with NC State University economist Dr. Michael Walden.

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