Jason deBruyn

Jason deBruyn is the WUNC data reporter, a position he took in September, 2016.

In the role, Jason investigates story lines hidden in data to uncover untold issues that matter to North Carolinians. He passionate about giving a voice to the voiceless and using data to shine a light on disenfranchised groups have been taken advantage of.

Prior to joining WUNC, Jason covered the business of health care and pharmaceuticals for Triangle Business Journal in Raleigh, an affiliate of the American City Business Journals network. His reporting roots trace to the Enquirer-Journal, a community newspaper in Monroe, North Carolina.

When auto manufacturers Toyota and Mazda build a $1.6 billion joint manufacturing plant in Alabama, it will mark another miss for economic developers in North Carolina.

North Carolina was a finalist for the plant, which will add 4,000 manufacturing jobs near Huntsville, but ultimately lost out in the final stages of negotiations.

It's a testament to modern medicine. Death rates from heart disease around the nation have been cut in half.

But new research sheds light on the wide disparities in cardiovascular death rates depending on geography.

Winter is coming, later and later. And then spring comes ever earlier.

Analyzing freeze dates from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) shows that the days between the first freeze of fall and the last freeze of spring are shrinking.

North Carolina's doctor offices are awash in pharmaceutical and medical device industry cash. These financial relationships are starting to raise questions about prescribing habits and other conflicts of interest.

Already, some large pharmaceutical companies have paid millions to settle allegations of kickback schemes, and watchdog groups are asking questions about deep relationships between some doctors and drug and medical device companies.

President Donald Trump is expressing support for an agreement struck by two leading lawmakers to extend federal payments to health insurers.

Across academia, faculty and graduate students perform all kinds of research. Their findings lead to new medicines, better understanding of space and time, or how the brain ticks. Universities brag about the economic impact their research has. Every year, for example, North Carolina schools bring in more than $3 billion of research funding.

Updated 5:49 p.m., October 13, 2017

An NCAA infractions committee decided it will not punish UNC as it relates to "paper courses" attended by students, including student athletes.

At WakeMed Health and Hospitals, the emergency department stays busy around the clock. More than ever, it's not just chest pain or trouble breathing that brings people in.

The N.C. Department of Transportation began distributing nearly $148 million to more than 500 cities and towns across the state to help with maintenance of local roads.

Three confederate monuments on the state capitol grounds will stay up for now.

Updated 5:13 p.m., August 18, 2017

Several thousand people marched in downtown Durham in a demonstration against racism on Friday afternoon.

The United States Supreme Court will decide if states may draw voting districts to gain a partisan advantage.

The ruling is not expected until next year but will greatly impact North Carolina's voting districts, which are among the most severely gerrymandered in the country.

Apartment demand in Raleigh will grow at one of the fastest rates in the country, according to a new housing report.

In fact, the research estimates that apartment units will increase by 69 percent in the greater Raleigh area by 2030.

With the buzzing sound of hair clippers in the background, Horace Robinson, the owner of Upper Cutz barber shop, laments that the last bank branch in his rural town closed.

"Now we’ve got to go 15, 20 miles to another branch in order just to get change," said Robinson, while shaping a client’s mustache and beard.

Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina filed to increase Affordable Care Act premiums by 22.9 percent next year.

House Bill 2 apparently did not dampen tourism in 2016.

North Carolina recorded a record $22.9 billion in visitor spending last year, according to figures recently put out by the Department of Commerce.

That’s an increase of 4.3 percent from 2015 and supported more than 218,000 tourism jobs, according to commerce.

Updated at 12:53 p.m., June 21, 2017

North Carolina state senators are expected to give final approval to a $23 billion dollar state budget Wednesday afternoon.

A fourth veto, and now a fourth override, and now hog farmers are shielded with government protection.

Governor Roy Cooper sharply criticized the federal government after it gave North Carolina less than 1 percent of the relief funds sought to assist victims of Hurricane Matthew.

Financial services giant Credit Suisse will add 1,200 new jobs in North Carolina and invest more than $70 million at its Research Triangle Park campus, the company announced Tuesday.

In many homes across the state, residents come home from work, turn on their lights, run their dishwashers and watch television or browse the Internet. They do all this without giving much thought to the electricity that courses for miles underground and through their house to power these devices.

Lawmakers recently passed a bill reducing the size of the North Carolina Court of Appeals. Republicans said the court's caseload is down, but Democrats complained the only motivation was to prevent Governor Cooper from making appointments.

So who’s right?

Flooding. Sewer spills. Contaminated drinking water.

Across North Carolina's communities, water systems have been pushed to their limits, and in some cases overrun. Hurricane Matthew, for example, wreaked havoc. On a smaller scale, flooding throughout the Triangle this week showed that drainage systems are susceptible even outside major disasters.

The king of beers is, well, still the king of beers. But the hundreds of small breweries, including many in North Carolina, are quickly gaining steam.

Over the past few years, teachers across North Carolina received highly publicized pay raises.

The increases were generally met with few objections and heralded as long overdue.

Left out of the press releases, however, was a shift that reduced teaching assistant positions, something that will hurt disadvantaged students across the state.


Workplace fatalities in North Carolina hit a six-year high, according to preliminary data released by the N.C. Department of Labor.

North Carolina's abortion rate has inched up since 2011, even as the national rate continues a long and steady decline, according to new figures released by the Guttmacher Institute, a research group that supports legalized abortion.

North Carolina's public universities will likely increase tuition and fees for new students.

Even after a 2 percent tuition increase, however, North Carolina public universities would still rank among the cheapest when compared to respective peers.

Just as a new Republican-led Congress on Capitol Hill is discussing how to dismantle the Affordable Care Act, North Carolina's newly elected governor pledged to implement portions of the ACA that had been left behind in this state.

This is the first of three stories in a series looking into North Carolina's opioid drug epidemic.

On many days, Louise Vincent still cries.

She thinks about what might have been. Maybe her daughter, Selena, could have been a mother herself. Maybe a teacher. Maybe a social worker.

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