Gwendolyn Glenn

Gwendolyn is an award-winning journalist who has covered a broad range of stories on the local and national levels. Her experience includes producing on-air reports for National Public Radio and she worked full-time as a producer for NPR’s All Things Considered news program for five years. She worked for several years as an on-air contract reporter for CNN in Atlanta and worked in print as a reporter for the Baltimore Sun Media Group, The Washington Post and covered Congress and various federal agencies for the Daily Environment Report and Real Estate Finance Today. Glenn has won awards for her reports from the Maryland-DC-Delaware Press Association, SNA and the first-place radio award from the National Association of Black Journalists.

In a Tuesday visit to Charlotte, North Carolina - a city still stinging from not making the finalist list for Amazon’s second headquarters - Gov. Roy Cooper said having a well-trained and high-tech workforce is his administration’s number one priority. Cooper made the statement during a tour of Siemens Energy, where he met Central Piedmont Community College students working as apprentices.

North Carolina has seen several efforts to take partisanship out of redistricting.  The latest appeal comes from two Mecklenburg County residents – District 92 Democratic State Representative Chaz Beasley and Republican Charles Jeter who used to represent that same district.

Republican leaders of the General Assembly say they have reached a deal to give school districts statewide more time to reduce class sizes for kindergarten through third grades.

The proposal, which still needs approval, also includes more money to keep art, music and physical education teachers in the classroom.

All this is good news for North Carolina's public schools.  

But it comes with some controversial political strings attached.

Gov. Roy Cooper proposed average pay raises of 5 percent for teachers this year and next year in his upcoming budget. He made the announcement Monday at Collinswood Language Academy in Charlotte, surrounded by teachers.

Gov. Cooper says the two-year teacher pay raise will cost the state $813 million and he says taxes would not be raised to make it happen.

In a visit to Charlotte Friday, the state’s new School Superintendent Mark Johnson says he looks forward to revamping student testing, which is one of his top priorities. He says a big flaw in testing is that results are not available in a timely manner where teachers can use them to improve student instruction. Johnson says the Every Student Succeeds Act, which replaced No Child Left Behind and gives states more leeway in education policy, offers the state the opportunity to implement better testing requirements.

Many teachers across the state are set to get belated Christmas gifts in the form of merit bonuses, pending a vote this week by the state board of education.

General Assembly members approved nearly $14 million last year to reward teachers whose students showed growth in third-grade reading and passed advanced placement and international baccalaureate exams.

North Carolina’s wine industry recently got a PR boost with a federally-designated, AVA wine district. AVA stands for American Viticultural Area and the new wine region is in the Appalachian High Country AVA.  


As college tuition continues to rise, some lawmakers and education advocates are calling on schools to spend more of their tax-exempt endowment funds on scholarships for low-income students. Those with endowments in the billion-dollar level are especially targeted by critics, who accuse school administrators of hoarding the endowment money.

Since the recession, endowments at public and private colleges and universities have bounced back to the tune of more than a half trillion dollars. But that hasn’t stopped increases in tuition at most schools, to the chagrin of some congressional leaders and others who accuse schools of hoarding endowment funds.

For the first time in 16 years, someone different will occupy the state’s attorney general’s office. Former Democratic state Sen. Josh Stein of Wake County and current Republican state Sen. Buck Newton of Wilson are in a close race to succeed Roy Cooper.

Thunderstorms doused demonstrations uptown Monday night but many residents upset over the fatal shooting of Keith Lamont Scott last week by a CMPD officer dressed down city officials at last night’s City Council meeting. They called for the resignations of the mayor, council members and chief of police.

The streets leading into Old Concord Road were blocked off to vehicle traffic for much of the night, but pedestrians were allowed to walk to and from the protest site. And as WFAE’s Gwendolyn Glenn reports, people were still heading to the scene after midnight with the smell of tear gas hanging heavily in the air.

At least a dozen police were injured during protests in Charlotte, following the shooting death by police of an African-American man Tuesday. Police say he was armed, his family says he was not.

WFAE's Gwendolyn Glenn has more. 

North Carolina lost seven NCAA sporting events on Monday and Wednesday the ACC pulled 10 championship events out of the state because of HB 2. This one-two punch has local officials concerned about economic losses.

Vice President Joe Biden was in Charlotte Monday, not to stump for Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, but to talk about the importance of community colleges.


After one year of providing professional development and other support to African-American male teachers, the founders of the group Profound Gentlemen say their work is paying off.

Former CMS teachers Mario Shaw and Jason Terrell founded Profound Gentlemen last year as a way to increase the retention rate of African-American male teachers. Terrell says of their more than 500 members nationwide—about 100 are in Charlotte—96 percent are returning this school year.

The Eastern Band of Cherokee tribe and the reservation’s surroundings in Western North Carolina are known for mountain beauty, rich culture, and history.

Of course, it's also home to North Carolina's only casino.

And it's home to Miss Native American USA. Her name is Kristina Hyatt, and she’s a dental hygienist who in the last year has visited reservations to promote dental care.

The number of rapes reported on college campuses is going up. UNC Charlotte has experienced one of the largest jumps, according to the U.S. Department of Education. 

Research suggests that students of color perform better academically and are disciplined less when they have teachers of color. But there aren’t a lot of teachers of color, especially African-American men. In CMS, just over 5 percent are black men and, nationally, it’s 2 percent. A Charlotte group called Profound Gentlemen is working to strengthen the support system for black male teachers, in hopes of increasing their numbers.

Governor McCrory is proposing an average pay raise of 5 percent for teachers next year. The governor revealed a list of education budget priorities in a speech in his hometown of Jamestown Tuesday.