Davin Eldridge

Reporter

Davin Eldridge is a writer and regional reporter for WCQS, covering all aspects of Western North Carolina news. He joined the station in February of 2016. A proud son of the south, Davin grew up in Bradenton, Florida, where he attended the Ringling School of Art and Manatee School for the Arts at an early age. Born into a family of German and Scots-Irish immigrants, the importance of hard work and sacrifice was ingrained into Davin at an even earlier age. Eventually he moved to the mountains of Western North Carolina when he was twelve years old, and he has never looked back since. 

 

Davin began his career as a reporter at the Macon County News & Shopping Guide in 2008, where he covered everything from crime, to local and state government, to human interest features. While studying journalism the University of North Carolina — Chapel Hill, he continued working as a freelance reporter for The Daily Tar Heel, The Highlands Newspaper, Asheville Citizen-Times, Mountain Xpress and The Chapel Hill News. In early 2016, Davin broke into radio when he began his work as regional reporter for WCQS—a media outlet of which he had long been a supporter. As such, he is committed to providing his audience with the very best news coverage possible, and presenting it with thorough, thought-provoking content achievable solely through hard work and a love for the craft.

 

When he isn’t working, Davin can often be found at home with his beloved Sheltie, Cosmo, and either angrily watching CNN, or happily reading a book. His interests include watching movies, writing the ‘great American novel’, world history, and eating spaghetti. His dislikes include IPA’s, waiting in lines, mathematics, and Brussel Sprouts. 

Ways to Connect

Davin Eldridge

In the wake of Mission Health’s controversial decision to end baby deliveries at Angel Medical Center, health system officials have agreed to meet with concerned residents in Macon County.

Davin Eldridge

Calling all cat lovers: Western North Carolina is home to the newly-opened American Museum of the House Cat. 

Town of Franklin

After decades of conducting business as a Board of Aldermen, the Town of Franklin will now be governed by a Town Council.

Davin Eldridge

Few regions in the United States have seen their politics changed more by redistricting and gerrymandering than Western North Carolina – and Asheville and Buncombe County in particular.  

North Carolina Department of Transportation

The current level of funding for North Carolina's transportation system just isn't enough, according to a national research firm, which is urging state lawmakers to act soon.

Davin Eldridge

Angel Medical Center’s board of directors  made it official – later this year, the far-western North Carolina hospital will no longer deliver babies.

Davin Eldridge

The town of Canton is in the early stages of planning a new bicycle and pedestrian lane, with the hopes of revitalizing its downtown area. 

Mission Health’s explanation of why it’s ending deliveries at Angel Medical Center – because it loses more than $1-million a year doing so – isn’t sitting well with Macon County residents. Local leadership, including Franklin Mayor Bob Scott and County Commissioner Gary Shields, both pledged their support to locals in protest of Mission Health, and encouraged them to reach out to local government for help.  

Angel Medical Center, Mapio.net

The decision to stop delivering babies at a Macon County hospital is proving to be an unpopular one in the mountains.  

Angel Medical Center in Franklin has been in the business of delivering babies for more than sixty years, but all of that is about to change come mid-summer.  Mission Health, which runs the small community hospital, announced it will be discontinuing child labor and delivery services at the facility in July.  The decision is unpopular with young people in Macon County.

franklinnc.org

So, what’s in a name? A lot, if you ask Franklin mayor Bob Scott, who recently began efforts to transition the municipal government’s identity from a Town Board of Aldermen to a Town Council. 

The Town of Franklin’s elected officials have donned the title of ‘aldermen’ for decades, but soon that may all change, if Mayor Bob Scott gets his way.

“’Aldermen’ is a pretty old, archaic term. When you talk about an ‘alderman’, and then you try to talk about an ‘alderwoman’, it gets pretty awkward.”

Raisetheagenc.org

The push to ‘Raise The Age’ of juvenile jurisdiction from 16 to 18 has been a long-fought battle in North Carolina.  Support for that change is growing this year, on both sides of the aisle, but it has some in Western North Carolina wary. 

North Carolina’s current law, passed in 1919, says that anyone charged with any crime whatsoever, will be tried as an adult starting at age 16.  New York is the only other state with such a law.  Critics in the Tar Heel State call this obsolete and counterproductive. 

Davin Eldridge

Last year’s wave of wildfires is still fresh in the mind's of many mountain residents.  Whether that was a one-time event or the new normal is something environmental groups from Western North Carolina are trying to figure out.

It was a packed house at Highland Brewing Company in Asheville, as well over a hundred residents  turned out for the “Before We Burn Again” panel discussion. 

Macon County Sheriff's Office

In the midst of a national opioid addiction crisis, doctors in North Carolina are prescribing more and more painkillers.  Western North Carolina is no exception, according to reports.   But a simple clerical error from one such report has helped motivate one mountain community to better tackle the crisis at home. 

  Duke and North Carolina started their push for the Final Four this weekend on ‘foreign soil.’  Because of the NCAA boycott of North Carolina due to House Bill Two, the Blue Devils and Tar Heels found themselves playing in Greenville, South Carolina – rather than the far more familiar Greensboro where the games were initially scheduled.  

Quintin Ellison

   Last fall, the conservative Charles Koch Foundation funded a controversial new center at Western Carolina University, to the tune of nearly $2 million.  Opponents are now releasing research they say sheds light on how Koch money influences public education.

The Hinds University Center at Western Carolina University was packed with students and faculty alike, for the screening of the new film “Starving the Beast”. The documentary explores how recent conservative policymaking is influencing public education.   

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