Davin Eldridge

Reporter

Davin Eldridge is a writer and regional reporter for WCQS, covering all aspects of Western North Carolina news. He joined the station in February of 2016. A proud son of the south, Davin grew up in Bradenton, Florida, where he attended the Ringling School of Art and Manatee School for the Arts at an early age. Born into a family of German and Scots-Irish immigrants, the importance of hard work and sacrifice was ingrained into Davin at an even earlier age. Eventually he moved to the mountains of Western North Carolina when he was twelve years old, and he has never looked back since. 

 

Davin began his career as a reporter at the Macon County News & Shopping Guide in 2008, where he covered everything from crime, to local and state government, to human interest features. While studying journalism the University of North Carolina — Chapel Hill, he continued working as a freelance reporter for The Daily Tar Heel, The Highlands Newspaper, Asheville Citizen-Times, Mountain Xpress and The Chapel Hill News. In early 2016, Davin broke into radio when he began his work as regional reporter for WCQS—a media outlet of which he had long been a supporter. As such, he is committed to providing his audience with the very best news coverage possible, and presenting it with thorough, thought-provoking content achievable solely through hard work and a love for the craft.

 

When he isn’t working, Davin can often be found at home with his beloved Sheltie, Cosmo, and either angrily watching the news, or happily reading a book. His interests include watching movies, writing the ‘great American novel’, world history, and eating spaghetti. His dislikes include IPAs, waiting in lines, mathematics, and Brussel Sprouts. 

Ways to Connect

wunc.org, Michel Tronchetti

A common frustration for residents throughout the mountains of Western North Carolina is the lack of high speed internet access.   They now have a place where they can vent. BPRs Davin Eldridge has more…

Author's Note: a link to the survey is provided at the bottom of the article.

NPR.org

As long as there’s a stage, there’s really no telling where a comic can be found—even in areas like Western North Carolina—where local talent has flourishes, and local business captures part of a $300 million industry. BPR'S Davin Eldridge takes a look at the comedy scene of the mountains. 

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Davin Eldridge

The opioid epidemic is unavoidable – even on Halloween in Western North Carolina.  BPR’s Davin Eldridge reports on a 'spooky' holiday decoration that some parents think went too far in calling attention to the problem.


NPR.org

North Carolina’s so-called ‘Brunch Bill’ gives local governments the option of allowing alcohol sales as early as 10 a.m. on Sundays, instead of the usual time of noon.  Hendersonville and Asheville quickly adopted the law. But to the west, there’s still plenty of debate about the bill in some communities. BPR’s Davin Eldridge reports on the contentious new bill and it's status within the region--examining which side of the issue each town is now on--and how a period of only two hours each week can differ so much between them as a result.

NPR.org

North Carolina is the fifth largest producer of peanuts in America, yielding in upwards of 200,000 tons every year.  Not a single one of them are actually grown in the mountains, but plenty of them make their way to the region nonetheless—where they’re often boiled into a distinctly southern snack sometimes called "Dixie Caviar". BPR News's Davin Eldridge takes a look at the history of boiled peanuts in the South, and their impact on mountain culture.

Davin Eldridge

In the age of the internet the future of the American department store has grown increasingly uncertain.

Earlier this year, Toys "R" Us—a company with nearly 900 stores across the country— filed for bankruptcy. Kmart and Sears underwent another round of store closings—from nearly 1,600 last year, to just over 1,200 this year.

Whenever these so-called “big box” stores close, it can often stifle development in the communities they once served, and hurt the bottom line of nearby small businesses. BPR’s Davin Eldridge takes a look at the little-known phenomenon of “ghost box stores”, and how these stores impact Western North Carolina in their own small way.

Davin Eldridge


Jared Gant

 


Experts predict the upcoming fall leaf season in Western North Carolina will be considerably better from last year’s, and you can thank all the rain the region received in 2017 for that.  BPR’s Davin Eldridge has more…

 

Davin Eldridge

After cutting its way through the South, Hurricane Irma left a large swath of devastation in its wake in Western North Carolina. On Wednesday Governor Roy Cooper toured a part of the region hit particularly hard by the storm. BPR's Davin Eldridge was there.

Progressive groups in Western North Carolina are pushing back against the Trump administration’s decision to end the DACA program in six months. BPR’s Davin Eldridge has more…

Well over a hundred demonstrators, mostly students, turned out to protest the administration’s decision at Western Carolina University. They made their objections heard next to the college’s so-called Fountain of Wisdom, in the center of campus. The crowds chanted "si se puede".

It used to be going out to the movies was a distinctly American pastime.  But movie theater attendance is down to a 19-year low, according to the Motion Picture Association of America. In the mountains of Western North Carolina however, that hasn’t been the case. BPR’s Davin Eldridge explores why…

Davin Eldridge

In a region where thousands of acres of national forest can easily separate one mountain town from the next, it’s not unusual for some residents to describe it as “the middle of nowhere”. One area brewery is looking to dispel that stigma, with the launch of a new public forum it says will show that there are, in fact, plenty of big things happening in the region. BPR’s Davin Eldridge has more…

Davin Eldridge

The Great American Eclipse proved to be a profound moment for many people across the country, including in Cherokee.

Visitcherokeenc.com

With the Great American Eclipse right around the corner, the small towns of Western North Carolina set to fall directly in its path are  busy with last minute preparations before the big event. But for the town of Cherokee, the celestial spectacle is more than just another tourist event.  BPR’s Davin Eldridge met with organizers there to find out what’s in store for the reservation…

Davin Eldridge

With last year’s wildfires still fresh in the minds of many Western Carolinians, safety experts are telling mountain residents to be prepared in case it happens again. BPR News’s Davin Eldridge has more…

Last fall, more than 50,000 acres of land burned in Western North Carolina, including many homes.  So this year, efforts are underway to prevent that, with the help of the National Fire Protection Association’s Firewise USA program.

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