Andrew Flanagan

On Monday night, a bombing timed to coincide with the end of an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester killed 22 people, many children, and injured dozens more. Today, Grande responded at length to the tragedy in a letter to her fans that she posted on social media.

In the letter, Grande says she will return to Manchester "to spend time with my fans and to have a benefit concert in honor of and to raise money for the victims and their families." No date was given for the concert, which the singer writes is still being finalized.

When you stream a song on Spotify, it's delivered in an audio format — imagine these formats to be containers as literal as a phonograph record — cheekily named "Ogg Vorbis." YouTube, one of the most popular music streaming "services" in the world by volume, prefers something called AAC, or "Advanced Audio Coding." Radio stations, whenever possible, tend to prefer

PWR BTTM has responded at length and in detail to allegations of sexual misconduct directed towards Ben Hopkins, a member of the Brooklyn-based duo. In a statement released Thursday afternoon, Hopkins acknowledges a sexual relationship with a woman who accused the musician of rape in an anonymous interview posted on Jezebel last week, but reports a different version of events. "[T]he statements made about me by the anonymous source did not line up with any sexual experience I have ever had," Hopkins writes in the statement.

"The death of the MP3 was announced in a conference room in Erlangen, Germany, in the spring of 1995."

On Monday, the Internet radio pioneer Pandora, one of the oldest music tech companies still humming, announced its first-quarter financial results. Like most of its brethren, the company both makes and loses a lot of money — it reported $132 million in net losses this quarter alone, but also announced a new $150 million round of financing and a shakeup of its board. Oh, and that financing requires the company explore all feasible avenues to sell itself off before receiving the cash.

We've known for a few months now that the Recording Academy was probably planning a return to New York for next year's Grammy Awards. Now we know for sure.

Following a wildfire in the Great Smoky Mountains region of her native Tennessee late last year which left hundreds homeless, country legend Dolly Parton immediately launched the My People Fund, promising to give displaced families a $1,000-per-month stipend sourced from outside donations and Parton's own foundation.

One week ago around this time, thousands of people seeking a luxurious island reprieve were preparing for a trip to Exuma Island in the Bahamas to attend the Fyre Festival.

A second lawsuit against the Fyre Festival could be a warning for the growing industry of "grassroots" social media marketing. A putative class action suit filed yesterday in Los Angeles Superior Court on behalf of three festival attendees names the organizers of the festival as well as 100 unknown (Jane) "Does," the "influencers" that made up Fyre's marketing keystone.

Last fall, at the Web Summit tech conference in Lisbon, Portugal, the rapper Ja Rule addressed a small audience seated in front of the event's music stage: "I'll let my partner-in-crime here Billy McFarland give you all an introduction of what Fyre is." At the time, Ja Rule and McFarland were promoting an app that would, we now know, share its name with one of the least-successful music events in recent memory, currently the subject of a

A new report shows that the worldwide recording industry added nearly $1 billion in revenue in 2016, growth that is almost entirely due to the growth of streaming. The annual "Global Music Report," released today by the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry (IFPI) — an umbrella group representing major labels worldwide — says that revenues from streaming were up 60.4 percent over 2015, and the industry overall grew by 5.9 percent.

Streaming's ascent has made the industry very, very willing to experiment. This wasn't always the case.

The cars were piled on top of each other and bleeding onto the curb of the highway as they inched west and north towards the Lake Ann Park parking lot, each blasting their favorite from the windows; families walked down the trail and under the tunnel beneath the highway they'd just come from, holding the strings of the purple balloons floating just behind them; families walking back to their cars had no balloons and little expression. Altars of brown paper lanterns, unlit during the overcast day, peppered the path towards the off-white, square-paneled compound.

Yesterday evening the world received its first taste of the musical treasures Prince kept locked within his Paisley Park home and creative nexus when a new EP, titled Deliverance was announced and its gospel-and-rock title track released to the wilds. The EP is set for release this Friday on the one-year anniversary of Prince's death.

A year ago this week, the artist Prince was found dead at Paisley Park, his home, studio, and party space in the Minneapolis suburb of Chanhassen. Today, a series of search warrants and affidavits from the criminal investigation of Prince's accidental opioid overdose were made public by the Carver County District Court in Minnesota.

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