BPR & Citizen-Times Partner For Two Asheville City Council Forums

Blue Ridge Public Radio and the Asheville Citizen-Times will partner on two forums with candidates for Asheville City Council. The first will be held Monday October 23rd at noon in the BPR studios. It can be watched live on the BPR News Facebook page . It will be aired the following Friday October 27th at noon in place of The State of Things. The second forum will be held Monday October 30th at noon and can be viewed live on the Citizen-Times website and Facebook page . Early voting for the...

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The State of Things

“The State of Things” covers diverse issues & topics in NC. Frank Stasio talks to authors, musicians, politicians, & citizens about subjects that matter to North Carolinians.

This week in North Carolina politics, state lawmakers voted to override another executive veto. Hours later, they introduced a proposal to amend the North Carolina Constitution. And changes to the judiciary are key to both plans that garnered attention at the General Assembly this week.

Asheville Area Chamber of Commerce

Population and job growth continue to be strong in the Asheville region, but wages are lagging far behind.  That's according to a report released by the Asheville Area Chamber of Commerce and the Economic Development Coalition of Asheville-Buncombe County.  The report studied a six county area (Buncombe, Haywood, Henderson, Jackson, Madison, Transylvania) and found the average wage per job is $44,800.  The national average is $62,100.

There is an unspoken rule that former presidents do not criticize the sitting president, but former Presidents Bush and Obama broke that rule on Thursday. They did not mention President Trump by name, but their calls for civility and a higher purpose were seen as a rebuke of the current president.

Presidential historian Douglas Brinkley joins Here & Now‘s Robin Young to put the former presidents’ remarks in context.

If there's one constant throughout Steve Bannon's career, it's his ability to reinvent himself. His resume includes time in the U.S. Navy plus jobs working with Goldman Sachs; Biosphere 2; a Florida maker of nasal sprays; and a Hong Kong company that employed real people to earn virtual gold in the online video game World Of Warcraft.

Two attorneys at the UNC Center for Civil Rights say they plan to carry on the center's mission despite losing their positions. 

This week President Trump and his chief of staff John Kelly defended Trump’s call to the widow of a soldier killed in Niger. And Trump gave high marks to his administration’s hurricane response in Puerto Rico.

House Speaker Paul Ryan is careful not to criticize President Trump publicly, but on Thursday night he found the right forum to do it.

Nearly a month after Hurricane Maria swept through Puerto Rico, almost 80 percent of the territory is still without power. While nobody expected a quick restoration of Puerto Rico's badly outdated power grid, officials have estimated that it could take at least six months.

Having police officers wear little cameras seems to have no discernible impact on citizen complaints or officers' use of force, at least in the nation's capital.

That's the conclusion of a study performed as Washington, D.C., rolled out its huge camera program. The city has one of the largest forces in the country, with some 2,600 officers now wearing cameras on their collars or shirts.

U.S. District Judge Susan Ritchie Bolton says that President Trump's pardon of former Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio does not "revise the historical facts" of his case — and that she will not vacate her ruling that found Arpaio guilty of criminal contempt.

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Arts & Performance

NOTE: This is the second in a two-part series on the Asheville Symphony Orchestra's search for its next music director.

 

Here’s an interesting situation that become a piece of obscure trivia:

Daniel Meyer was among six finalists this past season to become the next music director of the Fresno Philharmonic, in California. The person who won the position is Rei Hotoda. Now, Hotoda is one of six finalists to succeed Meyer on the podium of the Asheville Symphony.

NOTE: This is the first in a two-part series about the search for the Asheville Symphony Orchestra’s next music director.

 

The Asheville Symphony is a part-time orchestra. Everyone responsible for the music has another job, or two jobs. So it’s a little stunning to learn how many people applied to become the orchestra’s next music director.

 

437.